DIVE SITES

WRECKS  & REEFS

WRECK OF THE SS AENEAS

Photo by Rick 2019

WRECK OF THE SS AENEAS

Photo by Rick Aryton  2019

Photo by Kirsty Andrews Summer 2018

DIVE SITES

WRECKS  & REEFS

Photo by Rick Aryton 2019

Photo by Kirsty Andrews

WRECK OF THE SS AENEAS

The weapons testing has reduced the wreck to a huge mass of wreckage over a large area. The wreck was previously known as "

The Spread Out Wreck ". It is a wonderful rummage for divers and occasionally areas can be recognised such as the boilers and badly damaged engine. Very little of the wreck is much over 2 metres high and parts are buried in the seabed. Sometimes cargo can be found. Bales of rubber , the soles of rubber shoes and cheap imports from Hong Kong. Weapons can still be seen in the area and should be avoided. The wreck is at the centre of an area charted as a mine disposal area. Depth to the seabed is 55m.

ref. used:

Chipchase NickPersonal dive log, Chipchase N.

The British Ocean liner AENEAS Ss, Capt. D. L. C. Evans, was in convoy 21 miles S.E. of Start Point on July 2nd, 1940, when she was attacked by German bombers and finally sank on July 4th. As the vessel was the largest in the convoy she received particular attention from the enemy, one bomb passing through the port side and another going down the after cross-bunker trunkway and blowing out the starboard side.

This bomb, which exploded deep within the ship, is assumed to have killed nearly all of the engineers and stokers on duty. The number who lost their lives was 19, all crew. Capt. Evans was among the survivors.

ref. used:

Hocking C.Dictionary of Disasters at Sea during the Age of Steam

SS SCHOKLAND CHANNEL ISLANDS
24-30 METERS

The wreck of the Schokland represents the greatest single loss of life in the Channel Islands during the second world war, but it is not classified as a war grave as it is understood that no bodies remain on the wreck. Some 370 troops were on board this commandeered merchant steamer when it crashed into a reef on the 4th January 1943, and only 40 were rescued. Local reports suggest that the skipper on this day was a a last-minute replacement with no knowledge of local waters, and this combined with night manoeuvring and orders to maintain a near blackout, led to the collision with the reef at Grande Grune rocks , off Noirmont, and very swift sinking. The wreck is upright and most certainly intact with a nice prop and rudder and at the other end the bow stands proud. In-between there are two big boilers, a donkey boiler & the triple expansion engine.There are two holds to explore and even the captains bath is still there.

This website is currently under construction so please bear with us at this time, more dive sites & information on local wrecks to come. So watch this space. Thank you for your patience.

Photo by Kirsty Andrews

Photo by Kirsty Andrews Summer 2018

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